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Here’s Why the NYPD Stopped Releasing Discipline Records and What it Means

(DNAINFO) Murray Weiss | September 1, 2016 — The NYPD says it’s been unknowingly violating a 1976 law, but critics say they’re protecting their own.

The NYPD has stopped releasing “personnel orders,” which include police officer disciplinary actions, to the media insisting they have suddenly realized providing the information violated a 40-year-old state law.

It was “a lapse in oversight on our part [and when] brought to our attention, we corrected it,” Commissioner Bill Bratton said Tuesday of Section 50-A of the New York State civil rights code, which restricts officers’ personnel records from public release.

And “the resolution,” Bratton continued, “despite all the hue and cry, is not with the police department, not with the city of New York, but with the legislature of the State of New York.”

But numerous former top police officials, department observers, and even long-time police labor leaders, who were pleased with the department’s sudden reversal, say the NYPD was well aware of 50-A for years.

Source: Here’s Why the NYPD Stopped Releasing Discipline Records and What it Means – Civic Center – DNAinfo New York