Cultural Watch

Word of the Day – insipience

(DICTIONARY.COM)

insipience / in-sip-ee-uhns / noun

DEFFINITION

Lack of wisdom; foolishness

QUOTES

Too many prefer the charge of insincerity to that of insipience—Dr. Newman seems not to be of that number.

ORIGIN

Insipience “foolishness” comes via Old French from Latin insipientia. The Latin prefix in-, which has a negative or privative force, as in insipientia, is the ordinary Latin development of a reduced form of Proto-Indo-European ne “not,” which is the same source of Germanic (English un-). The Latin stem –sipient– is a reduced and combining form derived from sapientia “reason, soundness of mind, wisdom,” hence insipientia “foolishness, folly, stupidity.” The root word behind sapientia and insipientia is sapere “to taste, taste of, smell of, have good taste, feel, show good sense, be intelligent.” Sapere is the source of Italian sapere, Spanish saber, and French savoir, all meaning “to know.” The Latin noun sapor “flavor, taste, odor, smell” becomes Italian sapore, Spanish sabor, French saveur, and, through French, English savor and its derivative adjective savory. Insipience entered English in the 15th century.

Source: https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day/insipience-2019-06-20/